Climate Change Vulnerability of Native Americans in the Southwest

A collaborative approach to climate change adaptation planning for Native American tribes in the Southwest

Wadsworth Public Presentation

On behalf of the “Climate Change Vulnerability of Native Americans in the Southwest” research team, we would like to thank all of those individuals who attended our presentation on Friday, August 15, 2014 in Wadsworth, NV. This presentation highlighted some outcomes of our collaborative research efforts with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe over the past two years to investigate the Tribe’s ability to adapt to climate change. This project is funded by a two-year grant from the USGS Southwest Climate Science Center.

We would like to direct you to a few resources that were mentioned at our presentation:

Our project’s website: http://nativeadaptation.arizona.edu/

Our project’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/nativeadaptation

USGS Southwest Climate Science Center: http://www.swcsc.arizona.edu/

Cui-ui & LCT Habitat and Spawning video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sBAYBMeRFs

Southwest Climate Change Assessment Report: http://www.swcarr.arizona.edu/

Nevada tribes & climate change video: http://epscorspo.nevada.edu/native-american-indian-video/

Institute for Tribal Environmental Profesionals (ITEP) offers climate change adaptation planning resources, trainings, workshops, and courses for tribes

Link to article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10584-013-0737-0 Gautam, M. R., K. Chief and W. J. Smith, Jr. (2013) Climate change in arid lands and Native American socioeconomic vulnerability: The case of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe. Climatic Change 120: 585-599.

Link to article: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901114000641 Smith, Jr., W. J., Z. Liu, A. S. Safi and K. Chief. (2014) Climate change perception, observation and policy support in rural Nevada: A comparative analysis of Native Americans, non-native ranchers and farmers and mainstream America. Environmental Science & Policy 42: 101-122.

The 2014 Spring Newsletter for our project: http://issuu.com/nativeadaptation. To open the newsletter, click the link beneath the "Documents" heading below.

Thank you again for your interest in our research. Please do not hesitate to contact us with questions regarding this project or opportunities for collaboration on tribal climate change adaptation research.

Very best regards,

 

Karletta Chief, Ph. D.

Lead Principal Investigator

Assistant Professor & Extension Specialist

Dept. of Soil, Water, & Environmental Sciences

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

kchief@email.arizona.edu

 

William J. Smith, Jr., Ph. D.

Co-Principal Investigator

Associate Research Professor

Dept. of Anthropology

University of Nevada Las Vegas

bill.smith@unlv.edu

 

Aleix Serrat-Capdevila, Ph. D.

Co-Principal Investigator

Research Associate Professor

Dept. of Hydrology & Water Resources

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

aleix@email.arizona.edu

 

David E. Busch, Ph. D.

Co-Principal Investigator

Biologist

USGS

Pacific Southwest Area

dave_busch@usgs.gov

 

E. Schuyler Chew

Research Analyst

Ph. D. Student

Dept. of Soil, Water & Environmental Sciences

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

esschew@email.arizona.edu 

Documents